Spread the love

Over all the tour through the Lechquellen-area is of average difficulty. Going by the new six-scaled mountain- and alpinehiking range it is category T2/T3, this means “mountain hiking” or “advanced mountain hiking”. The editorial office at the ‘DAV-Panorama’ classifies all of the stages as “average” except for the third stage from the Göppinger to the Freiburger hut, which is classified as “difficult”.

What does that mean in practice?

Sporty beginners, who are fit enough to manage four- to six-hour-tours and ascents up to 1,100 height metres, are just right to hike at the Lechquellen-round. High advanced mountaineers can choose more difficult options and climb summits with climbing irons and rope on their tour to get their puls going. This is one of the specialities of the Lechquellenround: It gives you the possibility to define the difficulty of your tour yourself and adjust the hiking pleasure to your individual skills and preferences. “More difficult parts of the way like the one from Göppinger to the Freiburger hut via the Klesanza summit or the Gehren ridge on the stage towards the Ravensburger hut can be easily avoided.”, posts a user on outdoorseiten.net concerning the suitability for beginners of the tour.

Difficulty of the stages – an example:

Stage number 5 from the Ravensburger to the Stuttgarter hut can be managed on two different ways. Both options are with 5.5 to 6 hours walking time of similiar lenghts, however couldn’t be more different when it comes to their level of difficulty. Where you have to overcome an ascent of 1,100 height metres across the Madloch summit and Zürs you are left with having to climb only 50 height metres when opting the route via the Stierloch summit, Zug and Lech. The trick lies in the use of the cable bar ‘Rüfikopfbahn’, which covers the major part of the height metres and presents a pleasant option. Downhill the two variants have height differences of 720 and 570 metres.[/fusion_text]

Over all the tour through the Lechquellen-area is of average difficulty. Going by the new six-scaled mountain- and alpinehiking range it is category T2/T3, this means “mountain hiking” or “advanced mountain hiking”. The editorial office at the ‘DAV-Panorama’ classifies all of the stages as “average” except for the third stage from the Göppinger to the Freiburger hut, which is classified as “difficult”.

What does that mean in practice?

Sporty beginners, who are fit enough to manage four- to six-hour-tours and ascents up to 1,100 height metres, are just right to hike at the Lechquellen-round. High advanced mountaineers can choose more difficult options and climb summits with climbing irons and rope on their tour to get their puls going. This is one of the specialities of the Lechquellenround: It gives you the possibility to define the difficulty of your tour yourself and adjust the hiking pleasure to your individual skills and preferences. “More difficult parts of the way like the one from Göppinger to the Freiburger hut via the Klesanza summit or the Gehren ridge on the stage towards the Ravensburger hut can be easily avoided.”, posts a user on outdoorseiten.net concerning the suitability for beginners of the tour.

Difficulty of the stages – an example:

Stage number 5 from the Ravensburger to the Stuttgarter hut can be managed on two different ways. Both options are with 5.5 to 6 hours walking time of similiar lenghts, however couldn’t be more different when it comes to their level of difficulty. Where you have to overcome an ascent of 1,100 height metres across the Madloch summit and Zürs you are left with having to climb only 50 height metres when opting the route via the Stierloch summit, Zug and Lech. The trick lies in the use of the cable bar ‘Rüfikopfbahn’, which covers the major part of the height metres and presents a pleasant option. Downhill the two variants have height differences of 720 and 570 metres.

Over all the tour through the Lechquellen-area is of average difficulty. Going by the new six-scaled mountain- and alpinehiking range it is category T2/T3, this means “mountain hiking” or “advanced mountain hiking”. The editorial office at the ‘DAV-Panorama’ classifies all of the stages as “average” except for the third stage from the Göppinger to the Freiburger hut, which is classified as “difficult”.

What does that mean in practice?

Sporty beginners, who are fit enough to manage four- to six-hour-tours and ascents up to 1,100 height metres, are just right to hike at the Lechquellen-round. High advanced mountaineers can choose more difficult options and climb summits with climbing irons and rope on their tour to get their puls going. This is one of the specialities of the Lechquellenround: It gives you the possibility to define the difficulty of your tour yourself and adjust the hiking pleasure to your individual skills and preferences. “More difficult parts of the way like the one from Göppinger to the Freiburger hut via the Klesanza summit or the Gehren ridge on the stage towards the Ravensburger hut can be easily avoided.”, posts a user on outdoorseiten.net concerning the suitability for beginners of the tour.

Difficulty of the stages – an example:

Stage number 5 from the Ravensburger to the Stuttgarter hut can be managed on two different ways. Both options are with 5.5 to 6 hours walking time of similiar lenghts, however couldn’t be more different when it comes to their level of difficulty. Where you have to overcome an ascent of 1,100 height metres across the Madloch summit and Zürs you are left with having to climb only 50 height metres when opting the route via the Stierloch summit, Zug and Lech. The trick lies in the use of the cable bar ‘Rüfikopfbahn’, which covers the major part of the height metres and presents a pleasant option. Downhill the two variants have height differences of 720 and 570 metres.[/fusion_text]Over all the tour through the Lechquellen-area is of average difficulty. Going by the new six-scaled mountain- and alpinehiking range it is category T2/T3, this means “mountain hiking” or “advanced mountain hiking”. The editorial office at the ‘DAV-Panorama’ classifies all of the stages as “average” except for the third stage from the Göppinger to the Freiburger hut, which is classified as “difficult”.

What does that mean in practice?

Sporty beginners, who are fit enough to manage four- to six-hour-tours and ascents up to 1,100 height metres, are just right to hike at the Lechquellen-round. High advanced mountaineers can choose more difficult options and climb summits with climbing irons and rope on their tour to get their puls going. This is one of the specialities of the Lechquellenround: It gives you the possibility to define the difficulty of your tour yourself and adjust the hiking pleasure to your individual skills and preferences. “More difficult parts of the way like the one from Göppinger to the Freiburger hut via the Klesanza summit or the Gehren ridge on the stage towards the Ravensburger hut can be easily avoided.”, posts a user on outdoorseiten.net concerning the suitability for beginners of the tour.

Difficulty of the stages – an example:

Stage number 5 from the Ravensburger to the Stuttgarter hut can be managed on two different ways. Both options are with 5.5 to 6 hours walking time of similiar lenghts, however couldn’t be more different when it comes to their level of difficulty. Where you have to overcome an ascent of 1,100 height metres across the Madloch summit and Zürs you are left with having to climb only 50 height metres when opting the route via the Stierloch summit, Zug and Lech. The trick lies in the use of the cable bar ‘Rüfikopfbahn’, which covers the major part of the height metres and presents a pleasant option. Downhill the two variants have height differences of 720 and 570 metres.